An apologist for statism

A case for federal health care spending?

Former trial attorney in the tax division of the Justice Department (an oxymoron if there ever was one) and U.S. Treasury department bureaucrat Moshe Schuldinger responded to my letter of last week in today’s Record. He cited the polices of Otto Von Bismarck, the father of the welfare state, as proof that federal health care spending is not verboten. He also argued his case—employing a logical fallacy, the argument from authority—claiming the Supreme Court ruled it is ok for the federal government to engage in a myriad of activities even though they are not authorized in the Constitution, because the feds have implied powers.

Schuldinger would thus support the Dred Scott decision, FDR’s internment of Japanese-American citizens during World War II and other egregious violations of individual liberty, because the Supreme Court said they were constitutional.

As a career bureaucrat in DC, it is no wonder Schuldinger is an apologist for the federal government’s gross depredations of human freedom. He should read Richard Ebeling’s analysis of von Bismarck, Bastiat’s The Law, Judge Napolitano’s essay on the Supreme Court, and Rothbard’s The Fallacy of the Public Sector.

It is doubtful Schuldinger would embrace individual liberty instead of statism after reading these essays—because once someone has spent life in the “belly of the beast,” he tends to be resistant to the truth about the federal government.

 

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